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Types of Property You Can Buy With VA Financing


VA loans allow you to buy a wide variety of properties.

It doesn't cost a penny to talk....so call me right now and I will answer your questions!


If you plan to use a VA loan, you might be wondering what types of properties you can use your VA loan for. 

The most popular use is for a single-family residence, but you can also use a VA loan on a multi-family property like a duplex or triplex, but you can't go higher than four units in one building. To use it on a multi-family home, the cardinal rule is that the veteran must occupy one of the units as their primary residence. You can also use a VA loan for a condo if it's on the list of VA-approved condo associations, which I can send you.

You can use a VA loan for a townhouse, and it doesn't have to be on any list. You can also use it on manufactured homes that are 1976 or newer. It's allowed for single-wide or double-wide manufactured homes, but it's almost impossible to find a lender who will offer a loan on a single-wide. Manufactured homes must also be properly attached to the ground with a HUD-style foundation—it can't just be tied down sitting on concrete blocks.


You can buy multi-family properties up to four units with a VA loan.

You can also use VA loans for modular homes, which are growing in popularity. 

I get a lot of questions about using VA loans on acreages as well. Many lenders will tell you that you can't use it on a property with 20 or 30 acres, but that's simply not true. VA loans do not have a limit on acreage; it just has to make sense. More importantly, they want to know the use of the land because they don't want to finance a home if the veteran is going to use it for a for-profit use. 

Finally, you can, in fact, use a VA loan for a home with an agricultural tax exemption. You can't use it to buy raw land, however.

If you have any other questions about the types of property you can buy with a VA loan, don't hesitate to give me a call or send me an email. Like I always say, it doesn't cost a penny to talk.

Can You Still Get a VA Loan Post-Bankruptcy?


If you had a bankruptcy in the past and it involved a home that you used a VA loan to purchase, you haven’t lost your eligibility. Here’s the situation you’ll face instead.

It doesn't cost a penny to talk....so call me right now and I will answer your questions!


If you’ve had a bankruptcy in the past and it involved a home you used a VA loan to finance—have you lost your eligibility?

No, you haven’t. The Department of Veterans Affairs has a heart. They’ll always note that they lost money in that situation, but they have a non-collection policy.


You are still eligible for a VA loan, but only after a certain amount of time has passed.

Instead, they will send you a new certificate of eligibility request, note how much they lost on the home, and deduct that amount from your eligibility. You still have eligibility and you can still get another VA loan just as long as at least two years have passed since the bankruptcy. 

Remember, if you have any questions about this or any other subject, feel free to give me a call. I’d be happy to talk to you.

Who Qualifies for VA Loans?


Who can qualify for a VA loan? Do you have to have military benefits? I’ll go over the answers to those questions today.

It doesn't cost a penny to talk....so call me right now and I will answer your questions!


Who qualifies for a VA loan? I get asked this question quite often, and I’ll go over the details behind qualifying today. 

It’s true that in order to qualify for a VA loan, you have to be a veteran. However, a lot of veterans have spouses that are not associated with the military. Can they both qualify if that’s the case? The answer is yes. 

Fiances are another story. If you are not married, your fiance would also have to have military benefits in order for you to both qualify. If the fiance of a spouse does not have military benefits, they would not qualify for the loan.


The spouse of a veteran can qualify for a VA loan.



The main thing that the VA wants to achieve is making sure the people taking advantage of VA loans are actually living in the home purchased with one. Gone are the days when people could co-sign for a VA loan. Again, a spouse can certainly co-sign and qualify for a VA loan but don’t plan on having a fiance do that unless they qualify on their own. 

If you have any other questions please feel free to give me a call or send me an email. I look forward to hearing from you!